LED Online Seminar 2019 - Working Group 5

From Ledwiki
Jump to: navigation, search

--> Back to working group overview

Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 24:

A: Landscape and Democracy

Meinig, D. W. (1979): "The Beholding Eye: Ten Versions of the Same Scene." In: The Interpretation of Ordinary Landscapes: Geographical Essays, edited by D. W. Meinig and John Brinckerhoff Jackson, 33-48. New York: Oxford University Press. [Gianmarco]

Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. [Amala]

Sieverts, Thomas (2003): Cities without cities. An interpretation of the Zwischenstadt [Haris Pezic]

B: Concepts of Participation

Hester, Randolph (2012): Evaluating Community Design, Landscape Journal [Gianmarco]

Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press [Amala]

Sanoff, Henry (2014): Multiple Views of Participatory Design, Focus [Nafiz Rahat]


C: Community and Identity

Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press [Nafiz Rahat]

Gafford, Farrah D. (2013): It Was a Real Village: Community Identity Formation Among Black Middle-Class Residents in Pontchartrain Park [Haris Pezic]


D: Designing

Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration [Gianmarco]

Pritzker Prize winning architect Alejandro Aravena on sustainable design and community involvement in Chile [Amala]

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2013): Places in the Making: How Placemaking Builds Places and Communities [Nafiz Rahat]

Ruggeri, Deni (2004): Crafting Westport [Haris Pezic]

E: Communicating a Vision

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by May 15, 2019
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by June 12, 2019.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until June 30, 2019
  • Each group will also report on their process to come to a set of shared definitions of key landscape democracy concepts on the wiki documentation until July 12, 2019

Concepts and definitions

Author 1: AMALA

    1. The book “ Image of the city”: by KEVIN LYNCH:The book consider the visual quality of American city by studying the mental image of that city which is held by its citizens.it concentrate especially on “ legibility “ of the cityscape: which is easily identifiable and are easily grouped.”building the Image” : the formal types of image elements into which we can conveniently divide the city image: path, landmark, edge, node, and district.” “Structure and identity”: an environmental image analysed into 3 components- identity , structure and meaning.” Imageability”.Analysis made of central areas of 3 american cities: boston, masaccuchussets;Jersey city, new jersey, los angeles, California.these casestudies are more about the character and structure of the urban image.The city image and its elements: edge, node, path, district, landmark.Analysis examples: beacon hill,scollay square.
    2. CONSENSUS VERSUS DEMOCRACY: definition of consensus is ‘general agreement; collective opinion [Latin = agreement (as consent)]’. Consensus design is about everybody getting – if not what they originally wanted – what, after working together and listening to the whole situation, they have come to want. In design, the ‘whole situation’ includes both buildings, the place where they’ll be and the people who will use them. Consensus is not an automatic state. We may start with full agreement on major aims, but over details this is rare. Buildings are built out of details. this is much fairer, more constructive and more conscious – so more fully involving – than voting- and this is the reason for preferring consensus to democracy. Reaching decisions: democratic or consensual routes.states of the questions such as Which level to start at?Existing situation: sequence of levels for consensus appraisal.Design stage: sequence of levels for consensus decisions.
    3. Alejandro Aravena:THE DESIGN POWER OF SYNTHESIS- the architectural philosophy- Bringing the community into the process.If there is any power in design it’s the power of synthesis.the more complex the problem the more the need for simplicity.three cases that apply here: 1: cities : the global challenge of urbanisation.3S-scale-to channel peoples own building capacity..scarcity and speed.solution of participatory design process: initial social housing by including the families: with the example of chile.two major things to do: joint forces and split tasks: different designs with the same principle.2:how design can contribute to sustainability.example of angeline innovation centre.3: how design can provide more comprehensive answers against natural disasters.example: chile-tsunami-First alternative is forbid installation on ground zero.Second alternative is build a big wall-heavy infrastructure to resist energy of the waves.the participatory design is –all about the future of the city.alternative was valid politically and socially.Second problem is flood-approach was against geographical threat.Design power of synthesis is trying to make a more efficient use of the scarciest resourses in the cities which is not money but coordination.its just an attempt to put at the innermost core of architecture, the force of life.

Author 2: Nafiz Rahat

  • Concepts of Participation

Sanoff, Henry (2014): Multiple Views of Participatory Design, Focus [Nafiz Rahat] The conception of public participation how it was started in 1960 in the USA in the landscape development process. Deliberate democracy is required to make people more aware of the condition to make them understand the value & interest of others. Multiple views of participatory is to bring the planners, architects, and general public & policymakers on the same platform to create a ‘co-design’. "Participation" objective is to conceptualizing the issues with all groups & analyzing the public reaction to proposed action policies. At the next step, it is necessary to move forward to develop strategic planning & visioning. 1. Setting goals 2 taking action 3. Evaluate result 4. Improved quality decision. Finally, a consensus is very important to implement all these decisions into reality.

  • Community and Identity

Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press [Nafiz Rahat] Design for democracy is building an ecological democracy through the design process. It is about to remake American cities, know the American neighbors & indicate the community problems That helps us to sustain our liberty, our life culture & ecological system on which our life depends mostly. Ecological democracy is the best possible we can achieve through the combination of democracy & ecology. We have enabled the form to know our neighbors & resilient form to life, liberty & sustainable happiness. The design process must follow some ideas centeredness, connectedness, fairness, accessibility & sensible status seeking.

  • Designing

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2013): Places in the Making: How Placemaking Builds Places and Communities [Nafiz Rahat] Placemaking represents the identity of the local community depicting tangible & intangible heritage. We can learn from the essence of placemaking how to design a public space considering our previous experiences, how it works every day & connection between community & social spaces. “Placemaking is an act of doing something. It’s not planning, it’s doing. That’s what’s so powerful about it.” Fred Kent, Project for Public Spaces

Author 3: Haris Pezic

A: Landscape and Democracy

Sieverts, Thomas (2003): Cities without cities. An interpretation of the Zwischenstadt

This book tells us about the connection between diffusion and fragmentation of settlements and the process of globalization. Expressions such as the edge of the city, urban expansion, urban, urban territory, landscape city were used as a description of the phenomenon which, from the first cases of industrialization to today, gradually expanded to the point of undermining the idea of ​​the city itself. The most common terms in the book, urban landscape or urbanized landscape appear as conceptual keys through which the author invites us to see the complexity of social, economic and production dynamics as the decisive factors of current patterns of settlement change. We can still conclude that the future of Europe and the world depends on a local and global connection that must be well connected.


C: Community and Identity

Gafford, Farrah D. (2013): It Was a Real Village: Community Identity Formation Among Black Middle-Class Residents in Pontchartrain Park

Upon completion of the Second World War in southern US cities, middle class members began their lives in family homes. Scientists have been investigating the process of division into that class. Residents in Pontchartrain Park have created a community environment. The research continued on the people who built this phenomenon and it was founded on previous experiences with the enemies. Long-term communal ties also played a key role in the recovery of the neighborhood after Katrine.


D: Designing

Ruggeri, Deni (2004): Crafting Westpor

This book discusses a permanent participatory construction in a small coastal community in Westport, California, May 2003. The basic information on the identity of its people and places is opened, followed by a detailed discussion of the methods and results used during the process of developing a new city center. While the Westport community, in many ways, representative of other similar sizes and places, its specificities have led to unique results with regard to the methodology used and the design outcomes. The community's development needs and their changing attitude, functional relationships, and views are included in a design that is carefully crafted, tailored and calibrated throughout the process. Moreover, the effects of a highly recognizable physical environment on spatial perceptions of inhabitants have resulted in sophisticated design solutions. In addition, the way of life in an estuary defined the need for a flexible process that concerned the distance of the community and the limited resources.


Author 4: Gianmarco Gianni

  • A: Landscape and Democracy - Mapping the Terrain

[1]Meinig, D. W. (1979): "The Beholding Eye: Ten Versions of the Same Scene." In: The Interpretation of Ordinary Landscapes: Geographical Essays, edited by D. W. Meinig and John Brinckerhoff Jackson, 33-48. New York: Oxford University Press.

Any landscape is composed not only of what lies before our eyes but what lies within our heads. This leads to different ways people might describe a common scene. For those of us who are convinced that landscapes mirror and landscapes matter, that they tell us much about the values we hold and at the same time affect the quality of the lives we lead there is ever the need for wider conversations about ideas and impressions and concerns relating to the landscapes we share.

  • B: Concepts of Participation

[2]Hester, Randolph (2012): Evaluating Community Design, Landscape Journal

The article describe Larry Halprin approach to participatory process. The core for participatory process, are “Scores”(in term of music). The architect is a composer who activated all the senses, not just the intellect. The aim is search for enrichment, not immediate solutions to problems. It’s pursued through awareness walk during which he directed participants to sense the site being designed and to consider their feelings about the place. Scores made participants more creative and their creative ideas elevate architect design. The second step is “Performance”. Is expected the performance to reveal hidden symbols and form we only see in our dreams. (Archetypal emotive space) It is one thing to ask citizens what they want to do in a park and another to ask how they feel about the park. To Halprin, sense of community was based in the primitive tribe. “Collective creativity” means to synthesize into a whole greater than the sum of the parts. To perform this the designer need extended time to develop and maintain a
big, informed, and nuanced vision while continuously breaking down bigness into projects to be implemented, since time encourages moving back and forth between micro and macro scales. This approach doesn’t involve conflict mediation which usually leads to compromise and outcomes that meet no one’s expectations. This process is not bounded by goals and not manipulative since goal-setting is seen as a barrier to opening new avenues of awareness. Is proved that shared experience of scored collective creativity usually overcame conflict. Of course, some participatory methods do some of these better than others, but every one serves democracy better than exclusionary decision-making.

  • D: Designing

[3]Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration.

The word charrette is thought to originate from the word for cart in French, ‘le chariot’, with specific reference to a push cart that travelled the streets of 19th century Paris collecting the student artwork and architectural illustrations. The term charrette has been used since then to indicate a period of intense last minute work towards a design presentation deadline, and remains almost exclusively associated with the disciplines of architecture and planning. The main intention for organising a charrette is to compress the time taken to consult with various stakeholders, especially in the current climate of urgency and instant data exchange. The relative transparency created through bringing the key stakeholders together at one time, in one place, allows for open and constructive discussion, shared project understanding and sense of ownership.

Step 5: Reflection

design is about everybody getting – if not what they originally wanted – what, after working together and listening to the whole situation, they have come to want. The conception of public participation is very important in the landscape development process and Deliberate democracy is required to make people more aware of the condition to make them understand the value & interest of others.

By indicating the community problems That helps us to sustain our liberty, our life culture & ecological system on which our life depends mostly.essence of placemaking tells about how it works every day & connection between community & social spaces.

 Any landscape is composed not only of what lies before our eyes but what lies within our heads. This leads to different ways people might describe a common scene. Evaluating Community Design, Landscape .The aim is search for enrichment, not immediate solutions to problems.

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Landscape Symbols Author 1: Nafiz Rahat

Landscape Symbols Author 2: AMALA

Landscape Symbols Author 3: Haris

Gianmarco Gianni

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment

Landscape Democracy Challenge 1 (Nafiz Rahat)

references:

  • edition.cnn.com/2019/04/16/health/ocean-plastic-study-scn/index.html
  • www.asyousow.org/our-work/waste/ocean-plastics
  • www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wilderness-resources/blogs/ocean-plastic-rivers

Landscape Democracy Challenge 2 (Amala)

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 3 (Haris)

Your references:


Landscape Democracy Challenge 4 (Gianmarco)

Your references:


Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

  • ....
  • ....
  • ....

Conclusion:

  • ....
  • ....
  • ....

Your references

  • http://www.modenatoday.it
  • Why Control Immigration?: Strategic Uses of Migration Management in Russia – March 25, 2018, by Caress Schenk
  • The Community Planning Handbook: How people can shape their cities, towns & villages in any part of world - Nick Wates