LED Online Seminar 2018 - Working Group 9

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Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 18:

A: Landscape and Democracy


The European Landscape Convention (Florence, 2000) Mariana

Burckhardt, Lucius (1979): Why is landscape beautiful? in: Fezer/Schmitz (Eds.) Rethinking Man-made Environments (2012)Mariana


B: Concepts of Participation


Burckhardt, Lucius (1974): Who plans the planning? in: Fezer/Schmitz (Eds.) Rethinking Man-made Environments (2012) Tanjila

David, Harvey (2003): The Right to the City, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Volume 27, Issue 4, pages 939–941 Tanjila

Sanoff, Henry (2014): Multiple Views of Participatory Design, Focus Navid

Hester, Randolph (1999): A Refrain with a View, UC Berkeley Vrain

Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy - Sacredness, The MIT Press Magdalena


C: Community and Identity

Nassauer, Joan Iverson (1995): Culture and Changing Landscape Structure, Landscape Ecology, vol. 10 no. 4. Tanjila

Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press Navid

Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): "Cinematic Landscapes" Magdalena


D: Designing

Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing - Techniques for Participatory Design Vrain

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2013): Places in the Making: How Placemaking Builds Places and Communities Navid

Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Sustainable Happiness Vrain

Pritzker Prize-winning architect Alejandro Aravena on sustainable design and community involvement in Chile Mariana

Kot, Douglas and Ruggeri, Deni: "Westport Case Study" Magdalena

E: Communicating a Vision

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by May 9, 2018
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by June 6, 2018.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until June 12, 2018
  • Each group will also report on their process to come to a set of shared definitions of key landscape democracy concepts on the wiki documentation until June 20, 2018

Concepts and definitions

Author 1:Magdalena

1. Concepts o participation: Sacred Places - Prof. Hester (LA form US) aims to encourage the community/citizens, to participate into design process o their neighborhood. Sacred places are these areas and elements of the landscape to which the community has a strong conntection. These places can oten olny be identiied based on local knowlegde and experience. In design process, according to Hester, locals are asked to describe and map the "sacred structure" of their town. As an example, the "sacred structure" inspired the final plan to revitalize Manteo, small villige in North Carolina, US.

2. Design: Design participation according to Hester's Twelve Steps - community development framework consisting 12 points of design process, a.o. Listening, Setting goals, Acrivity Mapping, Introducing the Community to Itself, Confirming goals, Evaluation after Construction. As an example, this process was implemented in Westport, California, where a dialogue between designers and residents revealed a final design. As a result of this process, the residents of Westport received a community development project, which emphasized their needs for affordable housing.

3. Community and Identity: Cinematic Landscapes - using a real landscape in a film narration in order to expose the racial, gender, and economic power dynamics that led to the emergence of the actual crisis landscape. Example: Film "Beasts of the Southern Wild".

Author 2:...Mariana


1. The European Landscape Convention

Landscape policy : expression by the competent public authorities of general principles, strategies and guidelines that permit the taking of specific measures aimed at the protection, management and planning of landscapes

Landscape quality objective: formulation by the competent public authorities of the aspirations of the public with regard to the landscape features of their surroundings

Landscape protection : actions to conserve and maintain the significant or characteristic features of a landscape, justified by its heritage value derived from its natural configuration and/or from human activity

Landscape management: action to ensure the regular upkeep of a landscape, so as to guide and harmonise changes which are brought about by social, economic and environmental processes

Landscape planning : strong forward-looking action to enhance, restore or create landscapes.

2. Burckhardt, Lucius (1979): Why is landscape beautiful? in: Fezer/Schmitz (Eds.)

Landscape in Scenario 1: is a construct of different layers (visual, technological, natural, infrastructure) in a temporal dimension.

Landscape in Scenario 2: is an idealized image of phenomena resulting in a charming place.

Ruins in the Landscape: Symbol of past history, in landscape terms, erosion.

Beautiful Landscape: Construct comprised of conventional visual structures.

3. Pritzker Prize winning architect Alejandro Aravena on sustainable design and community involvement in Chile

3S : Phenomen divided in 3 main problems regarding Scale, Speed and Scarcity applied when people moving to cities.

The Design Purpose to understand and answer the 3S: To channel peoples own building capacity.

With the right design, susteinability is nothing but the regurous use of common sense

Participatory design : The attempt to find with precision what is the right question, and provide alternatives that are validated politically and socially. There is nothing worst than answering well the wrong question.

Design power of synthesis : To make a more efficent use of this cost-resources in cities, which is not money but cordination. Attempt to put in the most inner core of architecture the force of life


Author 3:Tanjila

  • Burckhardt, Lucius (1974): Who plans the planning

Planning is determined by legislative issues and implicated in a social framework. The urban planner's sciences and auxiliary sciences such as urban geography, urban sociology, and planning theory, planning methodology and planning strategy have made advances in recent times. However, how they are applied depends always on the character of the person doing the planning. To reflect on urban planning means not to study the newest theories on housing density or traffic management, it is primarily a matter of giving much broader consideration to the ways in which local authorities make plans to change their environment.

  • David, Harvey (2003): The Right to the City

The main endeavor of this book is to provide an anti-capitalist and revolutionary meaning, to the ‘right to the city’. A right whose meaning has however to be characterized. In this sense, the ‘right to the city’ not as a right that already exists, not as only a right to citizenship as it has been mostly understood, but as a collective struggle by all those that have a portion in producing the city and making the life in it, to claim the right to decide what kind of urbanism they are looking for. The collective labor that produces the city and its infrastructure, mostly builders and constructors, and those that create life in the city, various social and cultural groups whose activities and way of living enriches and produces city-life, are lacking the ‘right to the city’ because of the prevailing of capitalist urbanization.

  • Nassauer, Joan Iverson (1995): Culture and Changing Landscape Structure

This paper is focused on four different 'cultural principles for landscape ecology'. First comes human landscape perception, cognition, and values that directly affect the landscape. Secondly, cultural conventions which powerfully influence landscape pattern in both inhabited and apparently natural landscapes. Then, cultural concepts of nature which are different from scientific concepts of ecological function and finally the appearance of landscapes which is responsible for communicating cultural values.

Author 4:Navid

  • .Sanoff_Multiple views of participatory design

Participatory design : is an attitude about a force for change in the creation and management of environments for people. Its strength lies in being a movement that cuts across traditional professional boundaries and cultures.

collective intelligence (CI):s based on the ability of groups to sort out their collective experience in ways that help to respond appropriately to circumstances - especially when faced with new situations.shared insight that comes about through the process of group interaction, particularly where the outcome is more insightful and powerful than the sum of individual perspectives.

PROMOTING PARTICIPATION : By • Establishing a policy of inclusiveness • Holding open meetings • Making speeches to community groups • Obtaining public input • Making public announcements • Holding face-to-face meetings • Conducting progress surveys

  • Hester - Design For Ecological Democracy

There are 3 fundamental issue to ecological democracy :

1- our cities and landscapes must enable us to act where we are now debilitated.

2- our cities and landscape must be made to with stand short term shockes to which both are vulnerable .

3- our cities and landscape must be alluring rather than simply consumptive or conversely , limiting.

  • Places in the making MIT

Placemaking is a critical arena in which people can lay claim to their “right to the city.” The fact that placemaking happens in public spaces, not corporate or domestic domains, is a critical component to its impact on cities. Public places, which are not our homes nor our work places, are what Ray Oldenburg calls “third places.” Placemaking creates these “third places” that he describes as, “the places of social gathering where the community comes together in an informal way, to see familiar and unfamiliar faces, somewhere civic discourse and community connections can happen. Placemaking is an act of doing something. It’s not planning, it’s doing. That’s what’s so powerful about it. Barrier of placemaking : 1. Making the case for placemaking is harder than it should be. 2. “Making” takes time in a “here and now” culture. 3. Expertise is a scarce resource. 4. It’s hard to know who to involve—and when and how to involve them. 5. Placemaking exists in a world of rules and regulations. 6. Reliable funding sources are scarcer than ever. 7. There’s no glory in the postmortem

Author 5:V.D.

A refrain with a view: Hester Randolph

Balancing decision

Local participation enables the sense of community, surmount environmental injustices and give a voice to the locals. It provides support, carrying and realism to decision-makers and stakeholders.


Techniques for Participatory Design: Hester Randolph

Representing

This concept is about is representation techniques to create space with people by using democratic drawing, based on five fundaments: Representing people, exchanging professional knowledge and local wisdom spatially, coauthoring design, empowering people to “represent” themselves, and visualizing deep values such as community, stewardship, fairness and distinctive place. In a way, planners are the facilitators of representation, in participatory design.


Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Sustainable Happiness Randolph Hester

Enabling Form In participatory design keys to success are sacredness, sharing experience, caring, connectedness and simply to be what we are.

- ‘’Sacredness’’: ‘’Sacred place are key to sustainability’’, sacredness pulls us towards sustainable decisions and actions.

- ‘’Shared Experience’’: Communities must take a collective decision.

- ‘’Caring’’: through discussion and debates citizen shows care and attention to environmental issues.

- ‘’Social connectedness’’ is a key point to a peaceful sustainability and to social justice.

- ‘’To Be What We Are’’: Avoid losing social identity and background, being comprehensive is essential, simply bring up for the sense of place.

Step 5: Reflection

According to our readings, Landscape democracy is a concept for transforming a living space in a complex process, where the society plays a major role. Planning and implementation are carried out with the direct participation of citizens from different age and social groups because the landscape is a common good.

Landscape democracy is a collaborative phenomenon and the process of engaging people's profit into design through asking their opinion, improving their economic and social situation and placemaking and its main factor is citizen's participation.

Also, it is an organic process with the aim to create spaces for the people and by the people, where the active participation of the involved actors is the backbone to create, preserve or improve the place that is being under consideration because of its important spatial and symbolic value to the community. It is set by legislative issues and implicated in a social framework which is determined by urban geography, urban sociology, and planning theory, planning methodology and planning strategy and how they are applied depends on the character of the person doing the planning. Landscape democracy can be focused on four different cultural principles for landscape ecology-

1. Human perception, cognition, and values that directly affect the landscape.

2. Cultural conventions which powerfully influence landscape pattern in both inhabited and apparently natural landscapes.

3. Finally the appearance of landscapes which is responsible for communicating cultural values.

To conclude, Landscape Democracy result from planning and design in which citizens participate equally in the formulation of a coherent and fair proposal. By defining collective rules landscape democracy involve people and including them as part of the decision process. The collective interests surpass cultural and social differences and promote linking people to the environment.

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Landscape Symbols Navid Asadi: ...

Landscape Symbols Mariana Martinez Cairo: ...

Landscape Symbols Auther 3: V. D.

Landscape Symbols Author 4: Magdalena Giefert

Landscape Symbols Author 5: Tanjila Tahsin

Assignment 3 - Role Play on Landscape Democracy "movers and shakers"

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment
  • Each Landscape Democracy Challenge should be linked to two or three of UN's 17 sustainable development Goals


Landscape Democracy Challenge 1 :Navid Asadi

Your references:'

Landscape Democracy Challenge 2 -Mariana Martinez Cairo Cruz

Your references:

  • Suitable Development Goals by United Nations www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/

Landscape Democracy Challenge 3 Tanjila

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 4 : Magdalena Giefert

Your references:

  • Suitable Development Goals by United Nations www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/


Landscape Democracy Challenge 5 V.D.

References:

Assignment 5 - Your Democratic Change Process

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • After documenting and reflecting on your challenges you will continue jointly with one of these challenges and design a democratic change process

Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

  • The traditional and new forms for the local economy to use public spaces represent a challenge and an opportunity to improve city life.
  • It is clear that the current Mexico City government lacks the capacity, both technical and institutional, to generate a participatory decision-making process.

Conclusions

  • It is essential to create an initial "Awareness" before taking into action any spatial or social driven-by-proposal
  • Highly affected actors should be integrated in improvment processes , just as high change power actors should be committed and guiding these processes.


Your references