LED Online Seminar 2018 - Working Group 4

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Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 18:

A: Landscape and Democracy


IvanOskian - Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press

Souleima Damak - Olwig, Kenneth R. (1996): "Recovering the Substantive Nature of Landscape" In: Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 86 (4), pp. 630-653. Cambridge/Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

Souleima Damak - Kucan, Ana (2007). Constructing Landscape Conceptions. In: ECLAS (ed.). JoLA spring 2007, 30-41. Munich: Callwey.

B: Concepts of Participation


Elnaz Imani - Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press


C: Community and Identity


Jonas Löhle - URBACT programme, The European Territorial Cooperation programme aiming to foster sustainable integrated urban development across Europe.

Elnaz Imani - Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014.

Araceli Quempumil - Gafford, Farrah D. (2013): It Was a Real Village: Community Identity Formation Among Black Middle-Class Residents in Pontchartrain Park, Journal of Urban History.

IvanOskian - Nassauer, Joan Iverson (1995): Culture and Changing Landscape Structure, Landscape Ecology, vol. 10 no. 4


D: Designing


Araceli Quempumil - Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration


E: Communicating a Vision


Elnaz Imani - Goldstein, B. E., A. T. Wessells, R. Lejano, and W. Butler. 2015. Narrating Resilience: Transforming Urban Systems Through Collaborative Storytelling. Urban Studies. 52 (7): 1285-1303

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by May 9, 2018
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by June 6, 2018.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until June 12, 2018
  • Each group will also report on their process to come to a set of shared definitions of key landscape democracy concepts on the wiki documentation until June 20, 2018

Concepts and definitions

Author 1: Araceli Quempumil

Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration

  • Participation and collaboration: using the design charrette as a model of participation and creativity for reshaping the engagement of design professionals and making the processes available to business and organisations
  • Concept stage: Improvisation, exploration through drawing and creative thinking are core values for collaborative processes
  • Methodology for a good charrette: "The Nine Rules for a Good Charrette" 1. Design with everyone. 2. Start with a blank sheet. 3. Build from a policy base. 4. Provide just enough information. 5. Talk, doodle, draw. 6. Think jazz not classical. 7. Lead without leading. 8. Move in, move out, move across. 9. The drawing is a contract.


Gafford, Farrah D. (2013): It Was a Real Village: Community Identity Formation Among Black Middle-Class Residents in Pontchartrain Park, Journal of Urban History

The black middle-class residents:

  • Identity: through attending church services, visiting neighbourhood friends and participation in neighbourhood organisations
  • Strong communal bonds: pride, experiences, revitalisation by restoring homes, helping their parents rebuild and reestablishing a neighbourhood organisation in which members help create new housing for the heavily damaged neigbourhood
  • Segregation: between the black and white residents in New Orleans. "Black spaces" where the black middle-class residents could conduct part of their lives away from the threat of white violence, intimidation and harassment. E.g. "coloured" shopping areas instead of shopping in "white" shops

Author 2: IvanO


Lynch, Kevin The Image of the City

In an urban environment, people orient themselves using mental maps, these mental images gives the public a sense of emotional security and sets the ground for communication; this images compound of: Identity: uniqueness of the urban elements, Structure: the link between urban components and other systems, Meaning: the value of the urban elements to the observer.

Legibility - a term introduced in this book - is the central concept of this publication, characterizes the way people read the cityscape and engages in their way-finding around it.

Lynch’s Five Elements: Paths: routes on which people and goods flow, Edges: make the distinction a part of urban fabric from another, Districts: unmistakable characters, despite the fuzziness of its edges, Nodes: where activities take place, Landmarks: elements that stand out in the urban fabric.

In an urban environment, people orient themselves using mental maps, legibility - a term introduced in this book - is the central concept of this publication, characterizes the way people read the cityscape and engages in their way-finding around it.

Urban planners, according to Lynch, should create a clear mental maps for the planned region to help people in orienting themselves in the built environment, furthermore Lynch emphasizes on the capability of the community in operating and acting upon their environment.


Nassauer, Joan Iverson Culture and Changing Landscape Structure


Changes in landscape is driven by culture, at the same time culture is manifested by landscape, both aspects are encircled by landscape ecology, a term that exceeds the boundary of research and could be characterized as the following: The behaviour of human beings with ecological systems Land uses in the nature, Investigating landscape at human scale.

Researches conducted on this topic, focus mostly landscape structure disregarding the human behaviour, a more practical approach is constructed by pointing out that humans not only build landscape up but they manage it, read it and make decisions based on how they perceive it; this shows that landscape is blocked out by culture.

Climate, geomorphology or vegetations do not pin down culture. Landscape is shaped according to the political systems, economics, aesthetics quality and lastly the tradition of the place, the mentioned points are summarized by the label of culture.

Cultural principles have been introduced to serve as basis for designing landscapes, these guidelines could be summarized by: Human perception of landscape, Influence of culture on the landscape pattern, Nature in the point of view of culture/ science.


Block by Block

Minecraft is an adventurous game, proceeded in a 3d sandbox environment, gives players the freedom in choosing how the game flows, by building their surrounding settings with pixelated cubes.

Interestingly enough Minecraft has been used not for entertaining, but for shaping out the world, Mojang - the creators of this game and the UN Programme for Sustainable Cities brought this game to communities, aiming to fill the gap between communities and decision makers.

Ever since 2012 this method is applied in more than 30 locations, where the organizers gave use the language of Minecraft to design their neighborhood.

Author 3:Jonas Löhle (URBACT)

  • open decision-making and planning culture - citizens and civil society are strongly involved
  • transnational exchange between european cities - work together to develop effective and sustainable responses to major urban challenges and societal changes
  • implementation of lasting policies - improve the capacity of cities to manage sustainable urban policies and practices in an integrated and participative way

'Author 4: Elnaz Imani'

  • (Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press)

Versus democracy, which means the right of the majority to impose its will on the minority, consensus design is about everybody getting what, after working together and listening to the whole situation, they have come to want. This could work at a pre-emotive level, when we agree about the "soul quality" and essence of situation.

  • (Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014)

Landscape always plays an important and active role in the lifelong narrative, even in fiction film.

  • (Goldstein, B. E., A. T. Wessells, R. Lejano, and W. Butler. 2015. Narrating Resilience: Transforming Urban Systems Through Collaborative Storytelling. Urban Studies. 52 (7): 1285-1303)

Urban resilience signals a capacity to self-organise at various scales and to adjust behaviour in order to adapt to and transform emergent conditions—including the scale of appropriate action. We can do this across various ways of knowing and existing patterns of action, making them particularly powerful and accessible and telling the communities stories in order to identify system properties that are meaningful and compelling and enhance their personal and collective agency.


Author 5: ...

  • ......
  • .......
  • .......

Step 5: Reflection

Landscape always plays an important and active role in the lifelong narrative. Mainly, changes in the landscape are driven by culture, at the same time culture is manifested in the landscape. Researches conducted on this topic, focus mostly landscape structure disregarding the human behavior, a more practical approach is constructed by pointing out that humans not only build landscape up but they manage it, read it and make decisions based on how they perceive it. The landscape is shaped according to the political systems, economics, aesthetics quality and lastly the tradition of the place. The mentioned points are summarized by the label of culture. Cultural principles have been introduced to serve as the basis for designing landscapes. These bases could be summarized by the human perception of landscape, Influence of culture on the landscape pattern, Nature from the point of view of culture/ science. In this way, improvisation, exploration through drawing and creative thinking are core values for collaborative processes. We can do this across various ways of knowing and existing patterns of action, making them particularly powerful and accessible and telling the communities stories in order to identify system properties that are meaningful and compelling and enhance their personal and collective agency across various ways such as 1. Design with everyone. 2. Start with a blank sheet. 3. Build from a policy base. 4. Provide just enough information. 5. Talk, doodle, draw. 6. Think jazz not classical. 7. Lead without leading. 8. Move in, move out, move across. 9. The drawing is a contract.

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Landscape Symbols Author 1: Araceli Quempumil

Landscape Symbols Author 2: Ivan Oskian

Landscape Symbols Auther 3: Jonas Löhle

Landscape Symbols Author 4: Elnaz Imani

Assignment 3 - Role Play on Landscape Democracy "movers and shakers"

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment
  • Each Landscape Democracy Challenge should be linked to two or three of UN's 17 sustainable development Goals

Landscape Democracy Challenge 1 - Araceli Quempumil

Your references:

  • www.ssb.no
  • www.aftenposten.no

Landscape Democracy Challenge 2 - Ivan Oskian

Your references:

- http://www.lydianinternational.co.uk/

- http://www.ebrd.com/work-with-us/projects/esia/dif-lydian-amulsar-gold-mine-extension.html

- http://www.armecofront.net/en/news/amulsar-mine-and-vague-future-of-jermuk-according-to-lydian/

Landscape Democracy Challenge 4 - Elnaz Imani

Your references:

for thermal protection of buildings. Build Environ 2005;40(11):1505e11.

  • D. Gann, Building Innovation: Complex Constructs in a Changing World

Thomas Telford, London (2000).

  • J. Giesekam, et al.,The greenhouse gas emissions and mitigation options for materials used in UK construction Energy Build., 78 (2014), pp. 202-214.
  • C. Zhang, L. Canning, Application of non-conventional materials in construction, in: Proceedings of the ICE – Construction Materials, 164(CM4), 2011, pp. 165–172.

Landscape Democracy Challenge 5 - Souleima Damak

Your references:

  • ...
  • ...

Assignment 5 - Your Democratic Change Process

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • After documenting and reflecting on your challenges you will continue jointly with one of these challenges and design a democratic change process

Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

  • If landscape is understood in such democratic terms then the values of those who engage with a landscape and have intimate knowledge and experiences becomes fundamental.
  • In the case of community development, there are multifaceted influences of socioeconomic changes which affect, to greater or lesser extents, development's progress and sustainability. More importantly, suitable solutions in coping with such dynamic changes cannot depend solely on instinct and experience but require knowledge relevant to the context of a specific area with an interdisciplinary approach to project design and implementation.
  • As discussed in this article, socioeconomic conditions in each area varied from each other which is due partly to the differences in physical landscapes and environments. This has also been a significant determining factor for development activists to take into consideration during the process of project development and implementation, and it somewhat influences the continuity and sustainability of the development as a result.

Conclusion:

  • The most obvious cause of inequality is an inherent difference in competitive power of the actors. Particular sets of traits give some species a competitive edge, just as in society some individuals have traits that set them up for entrepreneurial success. Furthermore, dominance can be self-reinforcing.
  • Our analysis suggests that due to the very same mathematical principle that rules natural communities (indeed, a “law of nature”) extreme wealth inequality is inevitable in a globalizing world unless effective wealth-equalizing institutions are installed on a global scale.
  • By forwarding an understanding of the dynamics of landscape planning, and the differences, conflicts and power relations that are present in participatory processes, we could develop a theorisation of landscape as a democratic entity.
  • It is a fact that rural development activity would not exist and continue without public participation. The people can participate in, or be willing to join, development activity if such activity is accessible for them.

Your references

  • Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT PressSmith.
  • Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press.
  • URBACT programme, The European Territorial Cooperation programme aiming to foster sustainable integrated urban development across Europe.
  • Gafford, Farrah D. (2013): It Was a Real Village: Community Identity Formation Among Black Middle-Class Residents in Pontchartrain Park, Journal of Urban History.
  • Nassauer, Joan Iverson (1995): Culture and Changing Landscape Structure, Landscape Ecology, vol. 10 no. 4.
  • Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration.
  • Goldstein, B. E., A. T. Wessells, R. Lejano, and W. Butler. 2015. Narrating Resilience: Transforming Urban Systems Through Collaborative Storytelling. Urban Studies. 52 (7): 1285-1303.