LED Online Seminar 2017 - Working Group 6

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Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 12:

A: Landscape and Democracy - Mapping the Terrain

  • Antrop, Marc; Kühne, Olaf (2015) : Concepts of Landscape (Vittoria)

Landscape Concepts:

  • Bruns/Bartolomei, 2016 'Concepts of Landscape' (Fardokht)

B: Concepts of Participation

  • Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Vedran Vuković)
  • Furco, Andrew (1996): Service-learning: A balanced approach to experiential education.(Ahmed Kamal)

C: Community and Identity

  • Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014.(Ahmed Kamal)

D: Designing

  • Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Sustainable Happiness (Vittoria)
  • Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing - Techniques for Participatory Design.(Ahmed Kamal)

E: Communicating a Vision

  • 'Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu (Vedran Vuković)

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by April 30, 2017
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by May 10, 2017.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until May 20, 2017

Concepts and definitions

Fardokht Hadjisalimi:[1]

  • Concept 1: Concepts of human-centered landscape
    • People’s mental landscape constructs relate to (a) General knowledge, (b) Special knowledge. Since perception is culturally contextualized, landscape is a “cultural phenomenon: (a) Sensual responses to landscape, (b) The way people attach meaning and value to it (Bruns, Bartolomei, 2016). (A theoretical model is attached in the linked file)


  • Concept 2: Areas that people perceive as landscape
    • The landscape is people’s perception of their surroundings, a kind of nostalgia that can be detected. Our perceptions are socially and culturally contextualized, including memory. Landscape’s meanings can be interpreted by our minds and it can be perceived and appreciated differently by insiders and outsiders (Bruns, Bartolomei, 2016).


  • Concept 3: Value people give to in areas of their surroundings
    • According to constructive theory, we have four layers model about what people give value to in their surroundings (Bruns, Bartolomei, 2016):

1.Physical features and processes of nature and human made artifacts 2.Things that people take note of in areas of surrounding 3.Values that are shared among members of groups, learn from so called “significant others” 4.Individual landscape experience, values and emotions (A brief model and examples are attached in the shared link)


Vittoria Maria Di Giannatale:

  • Concept 1: The pursuit of sustainability: the needed metamorphosis of cities.

Nowadays, there is this vicious circle where intrinsic nonsustainable habits lead to nonsustainable environments, which reinforce nonsustainable habits and so on. The dissociation modern man has from “nature” is basically caused by the accomplishment of “freedom” through technology. Being now sustainability an imperative, designers must then re-educate people to behaviours that go side by side with landscape and sustainability. The wide variety of factors that can lead to the metamorphosis of cities into sustainable ones, in fact, refers not only to the space itself but also and especially to the communities that live it. Transformation of behaviours and space goes hand in hand.(Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Sustainable Happiness)

  • Concept 2: How to accomplish the metamorphosis of cities: the community.

Communities must feel involved and connected, physically and socially. This can be helped by the creation of places where people can share experiences. For example, good resources could be sacred places and educative environments. That’s because you protect what you know and care about. The pursuit of sustainability must then involve the partecipation of the community in the decision making process, which is best to maintain on a regional or neighborhood layer. In the end, citizens must be inspired to move from short-term, selfish interests towards a wider long-term public good. Here the designer must help this transition, because the process can be slow and shocking at first impression. (Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Sustainable Happiness)

  • Concept 3: How to accomplish the metamorphosis of cities: the space and the importance of resilience.

In the sustainable refurbishment process, factors that interest more the space itself are for example the importance of physical connections, especially between natural and built environment, because a connection promotes meeting. Then, the characterisation of an area, which is best to develop without trying to innerly change it and lose in this way its identity. Last but not the least, the fundamental core is the importance of resilience. The city must be resilient in order to be sustainable, in relation with its limits and biodiversity. The land itself tells how to build more resiliently. A sustainable city must be characterized by diversity, adaptibility, must have a limited extent, for a best functioning, and work on its apparent weaknesses to make them virtues (ex. recycling). (Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Sustainable Happiness)


Vedran Vuković:

  • Concept 1: Citizen participation
    • Citizen participation is a way of dividing power in order for the people/citizens to get a say in the political and economical decision making, as well as other matters of high importance to them. Citizen participation and decisions being made by the people is a base for a functioning democratic society.
    • Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4
  • Concept 2: Participation and nonparticipation
    • Aldo citizens seemingly may be participating in a decision making process that essentially might not be the case. Therefore, it is necessary to differentiate between the real citizen participation where people hold the power and the formal participation simply performed to satisfy the requirements of an existing participation process in a democratic society, as well as other stages from nonparticipatory approach to substantial citizen power.
    • Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4
  • Concept 3: Examining the landscape
    • Reading the landscape and taking under consideration all of the aspects of a landscape character is essential for proper understanding of the landscape and landscape management. Landscape cannot be described only by examining its geographical elements, but also by realizing its visual and experiential characteristics which varies from one individual person to another, and their perception of the landscape.
    • 'Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu


AHMED KAMAL:

  • Concept 1: democratic drawing.
    • “Drawing” is used to include the representation of the landscape by designers and community members through a broad range of media from sketching, painting and collage to modeling by hand or machine. also it used to visualize precisely places being designed. And understanding a place, communicating the detailed dimensions or essence of a space. By drawing the lines, designers imagine good space. they try to draw meaningful lines so that the space can be precious for people. This is why we need citizen participation. It is only through this process that lines have meaning and begin to live which gives meaning to people. (Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing)
  • Concept 2: The serving learning.
    • The service learning is educational programs for students whose have international goals to learn and develop through active participation by extending student learning beyond the class room and into the community through international internships, volunteerism programs, community services and field education programs. (Furco, Andrew (1996): Service-learning)
  • Concept 3: cinematic the landscapes.

The nature and the landscape playing an important role in the movies especially fiction films.It can tell us a lot of stories about the environment, climate change and the other environmental issues.which help people to ask more questions about the their nature, future, thinking about their world and how can they improve it which make them more active and understanding the importance of the landscape. (Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes)

Step 5: Reflection

  • Landscape means an area, as perceived by people, whose character is the result of the action and interaction of natural and human factors. It is people’s perception of their surroundings, a kind of nostalgia that can be detected. Our perceptions are socially and culturally contextualized, including memories. The people gives a value to their surrounding by telling stories about the place, sharing with their family and friends.

The nature playing an important in our life and to gives value to it for example using the cinema and fiction movies to telling us a lot of stories about the environment, climate change and the other environmental issues. Which help people to ask more questions about the their nature, future, thinking about their world and how can they improve it. Communities must feel involved and connected, physically and socially. This can be helped by the creation of places where people can share experiences. For example, good resources could be sacred places and educative environments. The concept of real participation of the people in creating their environment is playing an important role in designing their environment. Citizen participation is a way of dividing power in order for the people/citizens to get a say in the political and economical decision making. Citizen participation and decisions being made by the people is a base for a functioning democratic society. The designers playing an important role in helping people understanding their surrounding for example by drawing through a broad range of media from sketching, painting and collage to modeling by hand or machine. also it used to visualize precisely places being designed. Finally we agree that landscape democracy is an important subject in the process of designing so it is important to help the community member, students, designers whose have international goals to learn and develop through active participation by extending learning beyond the class rooms and into the community through international internships, volunteerism programs, community services and field education programs.

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Fardokht Hadjisalimi

Ahmed Kamal

Vedran Vuković

Vittoria Maria Di Giannatale

Assignment 3 - Role Play on Landscape Democracy "movers and shakers"

  • Samuel Mockbee (The rural studio)- Ahmed Kamal
  • Christopher Alexander (The Oregon Experiment, Pattern Language) - Vedran Vuković
  • Karl Linn (UC Berkeley, Community Gardens)- Fardokht Hadjisalimi
  • Leonie Sandercock (University of British Columbia, Collingwood Neighbourhood House) - Vittoria Di Giannatale

here

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment

Vittoria Maria Di Giannatale

Your references:

ahmed kamal

Your references:

  • www.isocarp.net
  • www.cairomsc.blogspot.de
  • www.bbc.com

Vedran Vuković

Your references:

Fardokht Hadjisalimi

Your references:

Assignment 5 - Your Democratic Change Process

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • After documenting and reflecting on your challenges you will continue jointly with one of these challenges and design a democratic change process

Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

The theoretical frame of the online seminar and of our readings gave us the foundations to face the chosen democratic challenge. In fact in our change process we include surveys to citizens, public meetings with them, information processes to involve them even more, and so on. A democracy attitude was held since the group discussion and then invested our challenge, where we found as leading aspects re-educating people about landscape and sustainability and involving in the planning process citizens of every age and social extration, because in this way the designer can receive a rich and various feedback, made of subjective and unique perceptions of the landscape. In this way, we think that a resilient, sustainable and democratic landscape can be accomplished, where inhabitants can feel “at home” and comfortable in sharing every-day experiences. The citizens (inhabitants or users) of the area that is gonna be the object of the change must be placed at the center of the process, so we hope that with the tools that characterize our short term, mid term and long term interventions this shift of the center can be made. It can be difficult to move people away from the “money call”, but we are sure that a blending of voices from a various but wide union of citizens can sensitize authorities.

Your references

  • LED lectures
  • Antrop, Marc; Kühne, Olaf (2015): Concepts of Landscape
  • Bruns/Bartolomei (2016): Concepts of Landscape
  • Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4
  • Furco, Andrew (1996): Service-learning: A balanced approach to experiential education
  • Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014
  • Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing - Techniques for Participatory Design
  • Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Sustainable Happiness
  • Simon Bell, EMU Tartu : Reading the Landscape