LED Online Seminar 2017 - Working Group 11

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Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 12:

A: Landscape and Democracy - Mapping the Terrain

  • Margaret Weber: Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press
  • Paulo Bruno Ziegler de Castro: Burckhardt, Lucius (1979): Why is landscape beautiful? in: Fezer/Schmitz (Eds.) Rethinking Man-made Environments (2012)

Landscape Concepts:

  • Anna Ilyuchshenko: Antrop, Marc; Kühne, Olaf (2015) Concepts of Landscape, in: Landscape Culture - Culturing Landscapes. The Differentiated Construction of Landscapes (Bruns, Kühne, Schönwald, Theile ed.)
  • Gaia Uguccioni: Sieverts, Thomas (2003): Cities without cities. An interpretation of the Zwischenstadt. English language ed. London: Spon Press

B: Concepts of Participation

  • Maggie Weber: Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4
  • Yasaman Rahimi: Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press

C: Community and Identity

  • Maggie Weber: Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press
  • Yasaman Rahimi: Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014.

D: Designing

  • Anna Ilyuchshenko: Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing - Techniques for Participatory Design
  • Gaia Uguccioni: Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration

E: Communicating a Vision

  • Paulo Bruno Ziegler de Castro: Storytelling example from the Scottish Islands
  • Paulo Bruno Ziegler de Castro: 'Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by April 30, 2017
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by May 10, 2017.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until May 20, 2017

Concepts and definitions

Author 1: Anna Ilyuchshenko

  • Concept 1: Concepts of Landscape
    • The concept of the term landscape in different languages carries a different semantic load. The development of the concept of landscape is constantly going on, as well as its understanding.
  • Concept 2
    • A designer should take into account people and rely on the current situation of the population by designing a space. Often a difficult situation may be turned for the better simply by a new approach and design.
  • Concept 3
    • A simple drawing of the problem can help to find a solution to a seemingly difficult task. Designers use a vast variety of methods of drawing and they all achieve their goal.

Author 2: Gaia Uguccioni

  • Concept 1: Rendering the Zwischenstadt

For a science to be considered as such, there is a need for a theoretical foundation. The identity of the zwischenstadt can be perceived, evaluated, recognized and also experienced differently. Is it possible to imagine the idea of a city created in a level of lived experience? (p. 49 Perspective and questions)

  • Concept 2: Para-aesthetics

We must be able to account for the basic mechanisms that allow the generation of ideas in the human mind. Functions of tracing, noticing and perceiving have a particular importance in grasping the chaotic richness of form of the zwischenstadt. (p.53 The cultural and political dissolution of the city)

  • Concept 3: Design consultancy

The resources of the modern community are human and social capital. They offer multiples not acquired skills, such intuition and judgment. (p.4 Design charrette: a design process)

Author 3: Margaret Weber

  • Concept 1: Participation

There are different levels of citizen participation, ranging from nonparticipation (1), to degrees of tokenism (2), to degrees of citizen power (3). These categories can be broken down into the subcategories: (1) Manipulation, therapy, (2) informing, consultation, placation, (3) partnership, delegated power, and citizen control. Where people and communities fall on this list depends on the developers and planners, the organizers of the community participation forums, the local government, and the community.

  • Concept 2: Division

Even while trying to promote citizen participation and improved community structure, divisions between the "haves" and the "have-nots" can form. This is most common in situations where groups with more influence and groups with little influence want use of the same space. Depending on what level of community participation is promoted, different voices may be louder and more influential than others.

  • Concept 3: Democratic Environmental Design

Urban design must begin to focus on connecting individuals, communities, and nature in a sustainable and democratic way. Design principles to integrate ecology and democracy into cities include enabling form, resilient form, and impelling form. A design revolution must take place in order for cities to become a place of community, health and joy.

Author 4: Yasaman Rahimi

  • concept 1:General agreement with whole situation in design

consensus design is happened when everybody be agreed with the building,the place and the function .hence, most of the people involved it,so it would be constructive and conscious.source:Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press

  • concept 2:Arrived at consensus

having a flexible mind instead of holding rigid belief and listening to variety viewpoint ,is play an vital role in achieving consensus.also public well being _ public interested_should take into consideration.source: Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press

  • concept 3:The significance of landscape in film

landscape and cinematic environment serves an important purpose in creating a film's mood and setting an atmosphere.in other words ,it gives meaning to cinematic events and positions. source:Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014.

Step 5: Reflection

The term “landscape” has a long history of evolution and is very closely related to human interpretations of this concept. Understanding and perception of landscape vary also from place to place and depend on society development. The interaction of geographical and cultural aspects affects the landscape experience as well as creates a consistency that makes the landscape integrated. According to this idea, the landscape as an holistic concept has very high significance, acts as a natural and cultural heritage and merits our full attention. (Bruns, Diedrich, et al., eds. Landscape Culture-Culturing Landscapes: The Differentiated Construction of Landscapes. Springer, 2015.)

Most of the time, city cores are complete in their structural form, constitute a small fraction of the city and are hardly influenceable. But cities are changing, they are not only a series of addiction and have not be seen as a political institution made of private man. The attention must be focused on the parts that shapes everyday life to perceive them as a cultural product. One of the role of the designer in the community is to show that it is possible to make a better use of existing building or environment, placing value in human and social capital in order to create an urban identity. (Sieverts, Thomas (2003): Cities without cities. An interpretation of the Zwischenstadt. English language ed. London: Spon Press)

According to Sherry Arnstein in “A Ladder of Citizen Participation”, there are three different levels of citizen participation, including nonparticipation, tokenism, and citizen power, with more specific “ladder rungs” within each. In order to promote the optimal landscape democracy scenario for every situation, all parties involved must ensure there is a balance of citizen participation, as well as the hearing and consideration of all voices - whether being of the biggest financier and shareholder, or of the smallest minority group. All-in-all, “Urban design must begin to focus on connecting individuals, communities, and nature in a sustainable and democratic way” (Randolph, Design for Ecological Democracy, 2006).

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Landscape Symbols - Anna Ilyuchshenko

Landscape Symbols - Gaia Uguccioni

Landscape Symbols - Maggie Weber

Landscape Symbols - Yasaman Rahimi

Assignment 3 - Role Play on Landscape Democracy "movers and shakers"

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
Yasaman Rahimi>: Lawrence (Larry) Halprin, (The RSVP cycle, Levi’s Plaza and Headquarters)
Margaret Weber>: Paula Horrigan (Rust to Green)
Anna Ilyuchshenko>: Anne Spirn (Mill Creek Project)
Gaia Uguccioni>: Robert Jungk (Zukunftswerkstatt)

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment

Landscape Democracy Challenge 1

Your references: http://www.kazpravda.kz/en/news/society/almaty-tram-depot-suspends-its-work/ http://www.urbansdgplatform.org/service/blog/17/155/postView.do

Landscape Democracy Challenge 2 (Margaret Weber)

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 3 (Yasaman Rahimi)

Your references:

  • ...
  • ...

Landscape Democracy Challenge 4 (Gaia Uguccioni)

Your references:

Assignment 5 - Your Democratic Change Process

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • After documenting and reflecting on your challenges you will continue jointly with one of these challenges and design a democratic change process

Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

  • It is important to recognize a future-oriented component in the social component. And it is equally important to recognize the city as a place for designing the future. The historic city is a horizon within which, thanks to the place, the exchange of experience, cultures and emotions takes place. In a transition culture, which is the centerpiece of the present city, the right to urban life also implies its right to transformation, according to plans for which "something different" is possible and constitutes the foundation upon which to define the line of a new innovation.

Your references

  • Bruns, Diedrich, et al., eds. Landscape Culture-Culturing Landscapes: The Differentiated Construction of Landscapes. Springer, 2015
  • Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration
  • Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press
  • Antrop, Marc; Kühne, Olaf (2015) Concepts of Landscape, in: Landscape Culture - Culturing Landscapes. The Differentiated Construction of Landscapes (Bruns, Kühne, Schönwald, Theile ed.)
  • Sieverts, Thomas (2003): Cities without cities. An interpretation of the Zwischenstadt. English language ed. London: Spon Press
  • Arnstein, Sherry R.(1969): A Ladder of Citizen Participation, JAIP, Vol. 35, No. 4
  • Day, Christopher (2002): Consensus Design, Architectural Press
  • Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press
  • Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes, In: Topos, No. 88, 2014.
  • Hester, Randolph: Democratic Drawing - Techniques for Participatory Design
  • Smith, Nicola Dawn(2012): Design Charrette: A Vehicle for Consultation or Collaboration