LED Online Seminar 2017 - Working Group 1

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Dear working group members. This is your group page and you will be completing the template gradually as we move through the seminar. Good luck and enjoy your collaboration!

Assignment 1 - Reading and Synthesizing Core Terminology

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Readings are accessible via the resources page

Step 1: Your Landscape Democracy Manifestoes

Step 2: Define your readings

  • Please add your readings selection for the terminology exercise before April 12:

A: Landscape and Democracy - Mapping the Terrain

  • The European Landscape Convention (Giya Elizabeth George)

Landscape Concepts:

  • Lynch, Kevin. (1960): The Image of the City, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press (Giulia Chiussi)
  • Bruns/Bartolomei, 2016 'Concepts of Landscape' (Saeid Saadat)


B: Concepts of Participation

  • Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy - Fairness (Saeid Saadat)
  • David, Harvey (2003): The Right to the City, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Volume 27, Issue 4, pages 939–941 (Giulia Chiussi)

C: Community and Identity

  • Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy (Mansura Perveen)
  • Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes (Mansura Perveen)
  • Nassauer, Joan Iverson (1995): Culture and Changing Landscape Structure, Landscape Ecology, vol. 10 no. 4. (Giulia Chiussi)

D: Designing

  • Reading selected: Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and pursuit of Sustainable Happiness (Giya Elizabeth George)
  • Vall, N. (2013): Social engineering and participation in Anglo-Swedish housing 1945–1976: Ralph Erskine's vernacular plan, Planning Perspectives, 28(2), 223-245 (Giulia Chiussi)
  • Pritzker Prize winning architect Alejandro Aravena on sustainable design and community involvement in Chile (Mansura Perveen)

E: Communicating a Vision

  • Participant: Haniyeh Golzardi
  • Reading selected: Storytelling example from the Scottish Islands
  • Online decision making with loomio
  • Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu

Steps 3 and 4: Concepts Selection and definition

  • Each group member selects three relevant concepts derived from his/her readings and synthesize them/publish them on the wiki by April 30, 2017
  • Group members reflect within their groups and define their chosen concepts into a shared definition to be posted on the wiki by May 10, 2017.
  • Other group members will be able to comment on the definitions until May 20, 2017

Concepts and definitions

Giulia Chiussi:

  • IMAGEABILITY (p.9 The image of the city (A), Kevin Lynch)

The property of an object to strike a chord of the observer. It can be given by the physical image but it also can be a feeling perceived through all the senses.

  • AFFORDANCE (p.232 Culture and changing landscape structures (C), Joan Iverson Nassauer)

The emotional involvement between an object and his user: the shape of the object suggests the way to approach with. It's a potential property of a meeting.

  • COMMUNITY TRUST (Ralph Erskine's vernacular plan, Natasha Vall)

Responsibility and belonging to the place where people live. It arise when there is tenant partecipation for planning and for financial issues.

Haniyeh Golzardi:

  • The most important step before landscape planning is to understand the process that formed the landscape and the pressure for changes on that.('Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu)
  • Reading the landscape is not about the valuing it but it's about describing or characterising it and give the landscape a name.('Reading the Landscape' by Simon Bell, EMU Tartu)
  • There is an eye-catching contrast between the centre of the town and the edges (surrounding) areas.As if the centre is more important than the other rest of the areas in the town.(Stromness, Urban Design Framework)

Giya Elizabeth George:('European Landscape Convention' and 'Life, Liberty and Pursuit of Sustainable Happiness').

  • Enabling Form : We as individuals and communities are emotionally and intellectually unprepared to take the complex and comprehensive actions necessary for sustainability. We need new forms enabling us to sense, understand and empathize with the multiple roles in our ecosystem.
  • Resilient Form : To be sustainable, cities must be more resilient. They must repair natural systems that have been stressed to the point of dysfunction and create new forms of habitation.
  • Impelling Form : The nature of problems have changed, and public attitudes have changed. As a result, our urge to compel must be largely replaced by a need to impel.

Mansura Perveen:

  • Cinematic Landscape (Reading Welk Von Mossner, Alexa (2014): Cinematic Landscapes)

Since our lives are dictated in so many ways by the environment we live in, the particularities of a landscape often seem to mirror certain feelings, and thus evoke our emotion & imagination. The attributes of such cinematic landscapes are not only geographical, but also socioeconomic in nature.

  • Ecological Democracy (Reading Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy)

Ecological Democracy is a concept that advocates for an approach to designing our local environments, that involves direct participation (participatory democracy), that is guided by a comprehensive understanding of the organisms, habitats, and events of our surroundings (applied ecology); in order to ensure a more vigorous interactive landscape that can sustain an enduring & joyful urban life.

  • 'Design's power of synthesis (Reading Pritzker Prize winning architect Alejandro Aravena on sustainable design and community involvement in Chile)

A good design has the capability to synthesize all the governing forces of a given constraint, however conflicting they may seem, and translate them into a form. The application of simple common-sense can often result into ingenious solutions to the most complex of problems.


Saeid Saadat:

  • Fairness is fundamental to lasting democracy in an ecological democracy, citizens are responsible for obeying just laws and disobeying unjust ones. Above all conditions for a democratic society and design, equal access to information is critical for creating legitimate involvement and well-informed public.Thus, to have a dynamic society the condition and context should be set in way to have inclusive planning and design to not only give response to needs of every layer of society but also considering the sustainability of environment and landscape for next generation.
  • Landscape is defined as interaction of human and non-human and the human perception of the resulting material phenomena like features and processes. In general perception of environment and landscape is different for each person in society and indeed it depends on experiences and context. So from the technical point of view if the experts of this field (ecologist, landscape designer/planner and so on) are the community who can understand the value of landscape and distinguished variety of types with their own worth they have major responsibility to spread their understanding in society. Hence, by increasing the knowledge and awareness of people regarding their surroundings and their environmental identity people will try more to maintain and enhance them. On the other hand the authorities and governments should provide the context of equal access to information and places for people to know how deal and act regarding the landscape and nature, though it is necessarily to have relevant laws for preserving the places and elements.
  • Landscape is not the physical ambient but people's perception of their surroundings. This distinction between the human being who contemplates surroundings and the environment which is being contemplated is fundamental to modern time. The perception of landscape in each region and nation is specified for every single of citizens in that country and region, hence this perception can not be translated to the other languages for the other nations and inhabitants. Each person as a mankind can give a life and meaning to his/her surroundings. This meaning can be as particular as the person- product of person's mind. So we should think of landscape not as an object to be seen or a text to be read, but as a process; of people continuously comparing memories of the past and perception's of the present to their aspiration for a future.

Step 5: Reflection

The image of the city has to be strong and well organized because it allows people to move easily within. Then every city is necessarily dynamic because it’s composed by people who makes it alive by changing and living it. The intersection between the framework and the movement is our landscape and it has to reveal the cultural background, to satisfy people needs and to face with constant challenges between storytelling and give a chance to be a part of it.

Landscape is defined as interaction of human and non-human and the human perception of the resulting material phenomena like features and processes. In general perception of environment and landscape is different for each person in society and indeed it depends on experiences and context. So from the technical point of view, if the experts of this field (ecologist, landscape designer/planner and so on) are the community who can understand the value of landscape and distinguished variety of types with their own worth, they have major responsibility to spread their understanding in society. So by increasing the knowledge and awareness of people regarding their surroundings and their environmental identity people will try more to maintain and enhance it.

Understanding the landscape, the processes that formed it and the pressure for change is an important step before landscape planning or design. It is not about the valuing the landscape but it's about describing or characterising it and give the landscape a name. Character means a district, recognizable and consistent pattern of element in the landscape that makes one landscape different from another rather than better or worse.

Step 6: Revised manifestoes

  • please look again at your initial manifestoes and update them with any new aspects/prespectives you have taken up during this seminar

Assignment 2 - Your Landscape Symbols

  • You can read more details about this assignment here

Giulia Chiussi

Haniyeh Golzardi

Giya Elizabeth George

Saeid Saadat

Mansura Perveen

Assignment 3 - Role Play on Landscape Democracy "movers and shakers"

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Christopher Alexander (The Oregon Experiment, Pattern Language) (Mansura Perveen)
  • Jan Gehl (‘Life between buildings’, how to study public life) (Giya Elizabeth George)
  • Walter Hood (UC Berkeley, Lafayette Park Oakland, CA)(Haniyeh Golzardi)

Assignment 4 - Your Landscape Democracy Challenge

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • Each group member will specify a landscape democracy challenge in his/her environment

Landscape Democracy Challenge 1: Giulia Chiussi

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 2 : Haniyeh Golzardi

References:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 3

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 4: Mansura Perveen

Your references:

Landscape Democracy Challenge 5: Saeid

Assignment 5 - Your Democratic Change Process

  • You can read more details about this assignment here
  • After documenting and reflecting on your challenges you will continue jointly with one of these challenges and design a democratic change process

Your Democratic Change Process

Reflection

  • Theory vs change model:

- Community anomie is the main reason for degrading landscapes in the community. The situation in Mohammadpur in Bangladesh is a clear example for this.

- Our ideas are built on rethinking about building setback spaces, this issue is crucial in restricting the forms of our city from becoming ‘enabling forms’.

- The current situation can be changed by converting all setback spaces into usable spaces with the support of stakeholders

- The foundations of our participatory processes includes citizens, government housing, ministry and policy makers, architects and engineer association and people in real estate business.

- To make people aware of the present situation and to encourage their participation various awareness programmes such as educational events, competitions, art work, exhibitions, workshops, round tables and games related to landscape for people living in the community has to be carried out.

- The process also involves activities for children because they can also be a part of this process as they have very creative ideas and opinion about their environment.

- This will help in developing a healthy backspaces in neighbourhood. Also people will be more engaged in landscape related activities which will encourage them to protect green spaces.

  • Take home message:

- To develop a sustainable environment it is important to develop sustainable values in the citizens so that they can understand the need and meaning of sustainable landscape aspirations. For achieving this educating the citizens, considering their ideas, allowing them to share their thoughts and needs and finding solutions based on these are very important. In our democratic change process, the idea is to encourage the participation of people as much as possible and help them to choose a future with well maintained landscapes.

  • Unresolved:

-

Your references

  • Hester, Randolph (1999): A Refrain with a View, UC Berkeley
  • Hester, Randolph (2006): Design for Ecological Democracy, The MIT Press
  • Hester, Randolph: Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Sustainable Happiness
  • Ruggeri, Deni (2004): Crafting Westport, Department of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning, University of California, Berkeley , CA (co-author)